#01
decorating / well-being / cooking / cleaning
Straw Amulet Iwai Musubi
Warazaiku Takubo
HINOKAGE, Miyazaki, Japan
¥4950
・Sales period: January to mid-August
・Reservations are possible in advance
  • straw
  • W30cm D6.5cm H35cm
the product:
This straw amulet is a lucky charm wreath produced by the second-generation owner of Warazaiku Takubo.
It is inspired by Mizuhiki, an ancient Japanese art form that uses a special (cord) rope. The production technique is the same as with Shimenawa (a sacred, braided rice rope), which you can find at Shinto shrines. By braiding a left-hand twisted and a right-hand twisted rope together, a tight connection is achieved.
Because of its structure, this straw amulet symbolises family safety. You can hang this amulet anywhere you like but you should avoid humid places. The straw has a lush scent and its original, fresh green colour gradually changes to light brown over time.
The lucky straw amulet is for daily use, whereas Shimenawa is generally only used for New Year's decoration. The shapes of Shimekazari (Shimenawa used as New Year decorations) vary from region to region, and are auspcious symbols for the local people, for example: cranes, turtles, birds, rice bags, etc... Every shape has a different meaning such as rich harvest, health, or flourishing posterity. The timing and way of hanging the amulet differs by regions and it is interesting to see the various regional characteristics.
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the maker:
Takubo’s factory is located in the village of Hinokagecho, near Takachihocho, a town well known for Japanese myths. Shimenawa production has been prospering in this district for a long time and it was certified as Globally Important Agricultural Heritage System (GIAHS) in 2015. Takubo’s business has been passed down through three generations of the family for more than 60 years and is soley focusing on producing straw crafts.
They use straw that comes from their own rice fields to ensure the uptmost care is taken when harvesting and drying the plants.
In addition to making Shimenawa for local homes and shrines, Takubo also produces straw crafts for daily life and home decoration.
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