1
plant kingdomtop ∧
#17
keeping / recycling
Inro Cedar Box
Toraya
MINATO, Tokyo, Japan
not sell the inro cedar box only
  • cedar
  • W21.3cm D7cm H27.5cm
the product:
Toraya’s yokan (a bar of gelled sweet bean paste made chiefly of azuki beans, sugar, and agar-agar) packaged in an inro* cedar box is a highly popular gift in Japan. In general, the culture of using wooden boxes for gifts was popularised in the Edo period and is still in use today. Toraya has various sizes of cedar boxes to match their selection of wagashi (traditional confectionaries). For example, there are five different sizes for 1-5 pieces of extra large yokan, four sizes for 2-5 pieces of large yokan and other types of wagashi.

The cedar used for the box and lid has a straight and well-defined grain.
As the name suggests, the lid has a gentle bulge, similar to the shape of a traditional inro* case.
The lid is made of thick wood, so you can enjoy the beautiful aroma of cedar drifts every time you open the lid.

The boxes are made so tightly that even if you hold the lid, the box underneath will not fall out. As it has little warpage, it can be used for a long time.
The cedar box is just the right size to reuse us a sewing box. The lid can be used as a workbench or turned upside down as a tray to keep your needles and buttons from going astray.
It can also be reused for a wide range of purposes such as a letter case and tool box.

The image shows the inro cedar box for 3 pieces of large yokan.

*Inro: A traditional Japanese case for holding small objects, such as a name stamp or medicine, that is suspended from the obi (sash) of a kimono.
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the maker:
Toraya was founded in Kyoto in the late Muromachi period, which is about 500 years ago. Toraya’s wagashi (traditional Japanese confectionary), which reflect the unique charm of Japan's four seasons, have developed in tandem with Japanese culture such as the tea ceremony. These confectionary continue to enrich the daily lives of Japanese people through traditional Japanese annual events.

Toraya value the connection between traditional Japanese ingredients, nature and climate as well as with producers and local communities.

The golden tiger (tora) is the trademark of Toraya. In the Edo period, golden tigers were painted on each piece of tiered black lacquer box, which was used to carry confectionaries to the Imperial Palace etc.. Nowadays, paper gift boxes and recyclable paper bags with the same tiger design are mainly used to carry wagashi, Toraya continues to delivery the charm of wagashi and Japanese culture throughout Japan and the rest of the world.

The gallery in Toraya's store in Akasaka, Tokyo, which was renovated in 2018, regularly hosts exhibitions that offer a visually rich insight into the history and culture of traditional Japanese confectionery. Toraya Archives (Toraya Bunko) collects and preserve the ancient records and documents related to wagashi for the purpose of passing on traditional knowledge to future generations.
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2
mineral kingdomtop ∧
#16
drinking
Cider Glass
DKRISTAL
GRANDA-SIERO, Asturias, Spain
€10.16 | 6 units
special thanks: Iván Montero Peláez
  • crystal
  • H11.6cm ø8.5cm
the product:
A glass made for drinking traditional Spanish cider. Cider is a light, sparkling white wine made by fermenting apples from the region. It is characterised by its low alcohol content and high acidity. The Asturias region in northern Spain is one of the most famous cider producing areas. In this region, there is a cider drinking ritual known as “escanciar", in which the cider is poured from an elevated position with arms outstretched into a low-holding glass. This flat-bottomed glass is designed to allow the cider to aerate, foam and release its aromas.

The glass is made of crystal with a high porosity, which allows the cider to penetrate the glass more easily. The whole glass is thinner than a wine glass, so you can feel the temperature of the cider when you hold the glass in your hand.
This cider glass, Sella 50 glass, is also used as a txakoli glass to drink txakoli wine, a specialty of Basque, Spain.

The Sella 50 glass is available as part of the Sella glass range, which includes the 500 ml Sella 50 glass, the 350 ml Sella 35 glass and the 250 ml Chiquito Sella glass, which means “small". Chiquito Sella Glass. The Sella 50 Glass, is known locally as “traditional" because it was the first to be made, and is also named after the Asturian city of Gijón.

The Chiquito Sella glass is a classic Basque glass, which takes its name from the word “zurito" (meaning small draft beer), and is also popular as a bodega glass. The Sella glass range, which is a series of glasses of different heights and dimensions, is popular in many bars and restaurants in Spain.
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the maker:
In 1971, José Ramón Bernardo founded the company Bernardo Representaciones in Asturias, northern Spain. Bernardo created Sella Glass, which is made of durable thin glass, as the locals needed thin glasses to drink the ciders native to northern Spain. Now renamed DKRISTAL, the company has been developing bespoke and original glassware for two generations. DKRISTAL's glass is denser, more refractive and more transparent than crystal or glass. They are also durable and have an incomparable thinness and lightness.

DKRISTAL specialises in glassware such as wine glasses, cocktail glasses, coffee glasses and pitchers, which are used in many restaurants and bars in Spain and abroad.
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3
animal kingdomtop ∧
#10
lighting / wrapping / keeping
BEESWAX
Everywhere
About Beeswax
Beeswax is a refined honeycomb made of wax secreted by bees when they mix pollen and other substances in their bodies. There are two types of beeswax: yellow beeswax, which contains unrefined and unbleached ingredients, and white beeswax, which is bleached and has no scent. Yellow beeswax varies from pale yellow to deep orange and brown, depending on the harvested areas, the types of bees, the types of flowers collected by bees and the amount of pollen. It has a subtle, sweet scent and a slightly sticky texture. Beeswax is antibacterial and water resistant, and has a wide range of uses including candles, crayons, furniture wax, leather creams and balms. It is also used in food such as canelé, which are baked in moulds coated with beeswax, chocolate and sweets. 
Beeswax Taper Candles
Compared to paraffin, the raw material for ordinary candles, beeswax burns slowly with a higher melting point of about 62°C to 65°C and it does not produce heavy soot. To make the traditional European dipping taper candle, you don’t need a mold as long as you have a kite string. First, hold the center of the kite string and repeat the process of dipping both ends to the melted beeswax and drying them. As you proceed, shape the core to make it straight and when the beeswax becomes your desired thickness, hang it up and leave to harden. The process fully utilises the kite string, because by dipping the two ends into beeswax you can create two candles at the same time. You simply cut the string when you want to light the beeswax candles. Their beautiful shape, which is formed as the beeswax drips and dries, captures a sense of gravity. The warm orange light of beeswax candles and their subtle, sweet scent will make you feel calm and relaxed. Beeswax candles were used in the days when there was no petroleum-derived paraffin, gas, or electricity. When you light a beeswax candle, you feel a new appreciation for both nature and electricity.
Beeswax Wraps
Beeswax wraps are made from cloth soaked with beeswax. By using the warmth of your hands and pressing firmly when wrapping, the slightly sticky beeswax paper will soften and stick together.
They can be used to wrap bread or rice balls to keep them dry, [to cover plates or containers, or to fold into a origami bag to hold snacks. Beeswax wraps are also perfect for storing cheese, because they allow the cheese to “breathe" and stay moist. Also, in New Zealand and Europe you could take your beeswax wraps to the delicatessen or supermarket, and ask for your cut cheese, sliced meats etc.. to be wrapped in the wraps instead of plastic bags. So the wraps can be used to live a more sustainable, ECO lifestyle. And also the antibacterial and moisturising properties of beeswax help to keep food fresh and reduce food loss.
The beeswax wraps can be washed in water and reused for 6 months to a year. They are also environmentally friendly and fully biodegradable. With a piece cloth of any size, beeswax, an iron, and cooking paper, you can easily make a beeswax wrap.They can be used to wrap bread or rice balls to keep them dry, [to cover plates or containers, or to fold into a origami bag to hold snacks. Beeswax wraps are also perfect for storing cheese, because they allow the cheese to "breathe" and stay moist. Also, in New Zealand and Europe you could take your beeswax wraps to the delicatessen or supermarket, and ask for your cut cheese, sliced meats etc.. to be wrapped in the wraps instead of plastic bags. So the wraps can be used to live a more sustainable, ECO lifestyle. And also the antibacterial and moisturising properties of beeswax help to keep food fresh and reduce food loss.
The beeswax wraps can be washed in water and reused for 6 months to a year. They are also environmentally friendly and fully biodegradable. With a piece cloth of any size, beeswax, an iron, and cooking paper, you can easily make a beeswax wrap.
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